Preventative Care

Regular Dental Checkup

Annual visits to the Dental office are recommended every 6 months to promote good oral health. Dental Exams and Cleanings are recommended twice a year, and typically X-Rays are taken one time per year.

First Dental Visit

A child’s first dental visit is an important step towards dental health. A child’s first visit should be between 18 and 24 months old. The first dental visit is to help motivate your child and familiarize him or her to the dental instruments in a playful way. The Dentist /pedodontist will examine your child’s mouth to detect decay, assess tooth development, identify abnormal facial development, teach proper oral hygiene techniques and give guidance regarding oral habits. Depending on your child’s co-operation few x-rays may be taken to help detect hidden cavities.

Space Maintainers

Space maintainers are appliances made to custom fit your child’s mouth to maintain the space intended for the permanent tooth when it decides to come in. They do this by “holding open” the empty space left by a lost tooth by preventing movement in the remaining teeth until the permanent tooth takes its natural position in the child’s mouth. This treatment is much more affordable and much easier on your child than to move them back later with orthodontic procedures. Think of space maintainers as insurance against braces.


Sealants protect the occlusal surfaces, inhibiting bacterial growth and providing a smooth surface that increases the probability that the surface will stay clean. The ultimate goal of sealants is penetrating into the pit and fissures of the tooth and sealing them from bacteria. Traditionally, sealants are thought of as a preventive measure for children and teenagers when they are in their “cavity prone years”.

Flouride Treatment

Fluoride, either applied topically to erupted teeth, or ingested orally (called systemic fluoride) during tooth development, helps to prevent tooth decay, strengthen tooth enamel, and reduce the harmful effects of plaque. Fluoride also makes the entire tooth structure more resistant to decay and promotes remineralization, which aids in repairing early decay before the damage is even visible.


All children need to brush their teeth at least two times a day, at night before bedtime, and in the morning after breakfast. By disturbing and removing the plaque formation twice a day, parents can minimize or eliminate their children’s potential for decay. For younger children a parent should brush their teeth using a pea-sized amount of toothpaste. As the child gets older and you see they have the dexterity and patience to properly take care of their teeth, you may give over the task. But do periodically monitor their care. Toothpaste should be approved by the American Dental Association. Toothbrushes should be the proper size, smaller is better than bigger, and always use a soft nylon brush in a circular manner. This will prevent toothbrush abrasion, excessive wear of the enamel at the gum line. Also a toothbrush should be replaced when it is worn, bristles splayed, or after more serious colds, infection, Strep throat, etc.